More on Post Office Terrace Studio

Added to the site this week have been:

  1. An updated introduction to the transcripts of the 1932 to 1935 studio diaries from Ramsey and Muspratt. This has followed closer studying of the handwriting in the 1932 volume and comparisons with exemplars of the handwriting of Lettice Ramsey and Helen Muspratt, kindly provided by their respective families.
  2. An update to our guide to using the negatives from Post Office Terrace Studio. This follows a visit to the Shire Hall bunker where those negatives thought to be on Cellulose Nitrate stock are stored.

Links to both of the above can be found here: http://www.fadingimages.uk/POT1.asp

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Post Office Terrace Studio, Cambridge

For those interested in this studio, which operated from 1865 to 1985 in Cambridge, we have just added to the site a transcript of diaries from the studio for 1932, 1933 and 1935, the early years of occupancy by Ramsey and Muspratt. You can access these here: http://www.fadingimages.uk/POT1.asp .  The diaries list those whose portraits were taken by the firm. If you recognise names of sitters listed in the diaries worthy of additional footnotes, please let us know.

Also as part of the Ramsey and Muspratt story, we have added some comments on the layout of their first premises at 20 St Andrews Street, Cambridge.  You can access this through the site entry for Ramsey and Muspratt http://www.fadingimages.uk/photoRa.asp

Enjoy.

Happy New Year and news of the site

I couldn’t find a carte de visite expressing a “Happy New Year” sentiment – I’m sure they exist. Instead – here is one with a belated Christmas message.

Xmas1

A couple of new mystery items have been added today to the site at http://www.fadingimages.uk/current.asp – any help with these would be much appreciated.

Meanwhile many hours have been spent on transcribing studio diaries from Ramsey and Muspratt at the Post Office Terrace Studio in Cambridge. These are from the early 1930s when the firm was founded and cover the period before the start of the firm’s extensive card index of its clients, now housed in the marvelous Cambridgeshire Collection. Transcription is complete and work is being finalised in adding references and explanations from local press research. The diaries will be published on the site later this month.

Working on negatives

The last few weeks have been spent working on negatives (so there have been few updates to the site). First, in an attempt to identify the sitter in a recently purchased cabinet photograph, taken by JE Bliss at Post Office Terrace Studio, I have been trying to understand the cataloguing of the fabulous collection of negatives from this Cambridge studio deposited in the Cambridgeshire Collection by Peter Lofts. It turns out that finding the negative of my print was a 300,000:1 shot – which actually worked! With much help from Mary Burgess a finding aid has now been written for this material – now available in the Cambridgeshire Collection and available on this site shortly.

Second a collection of around 5000 negatives and some prints by Cambridge photographer Thomas Howell are being catalogued ready to be deposited in the Cambridgeshire Collection. Below is an example print from the early 1940s showing a Rolls Royce car parked on Cambridge Market Place. The most interesting aspect of this photograph is that it catches construction of the Cambridge Guildhall, which had been re-designed in 1939.

thowell3

Post Office Terrace Cambridge, and more

Delighted to meet Peter Lofts and his wife this week. Peter was the final owner and photographer operating at Post Office Terrace Cambridge, one of the oldest and longest continually occupied studios in England. Peter has saved negatives from all the occupants of this historic studio and they are all on loan at the Cambridgeshire Collection. Peter is writing a book on the studio.

Also this week some examples of the work of Cambridgeshire photographers have been bought from Greece and Denmark and posted on the site.

Tried out today the new computer-controlled film reader at the Cambridgeshire Collection – an improvement on the older versions of readers, but it is still a little awkward to scan the huge pages of old newspapers – fit the page on the screen and it’s too tiny to read, fit less than a page on the screen and you are constantly moving round to find the edges. Spent the morning looking through the Cambridge Independent Press for 1844 and 1845 looking for a report of the moonlight flit of the first Cambridge Daguerreotype photographer – sadly there was no such report. But – one interesting find was an advertisement for the sale of a library and other items by the executors from the estate of the late Rev T E Rogers of Lackford Suffolk on 26th and 27th Nov 1844 which included a “complete Daguerreotype apparatus made by one of the first opticians in Paris”. I wonder who bought this and whether the purchase led to a successful career as a photographer.

Working on Valentine Blanchard

This week I have been re-working the entries on http://www.fadingimages.uk on Valentine Blanchard. It was pointed out to me that the information on the site was at variance with Mike Petty’s articles on the Post Office Terrace Studio, in that I had shown but one Valentine, while Mike wrote about an uncle and nephew duo of the same name. I’d found quite a lot of information about Valentine and had thought that it could all relate to one person – a conclusion also reached by the photoLondon web site. I should have known better – Mike was right and I’ve now located Valentine Blanchard Jnr (Valentine Louis Blanchard) – and what an interesting character he turns out to be. The new information is still being written up and entries on the site should be updated in the next few days.

While going through the Photographic Journal for 1916 today I came across the above sketch of a Sanderson Camera – designed by Cambridge photographer FH Sanderson.